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Structure. 2014 Feb 4;22(2):182-4. doi: 10.1016/j.str.2014.01.002.

Diffuse X-ray scattering to model protein motions.

Author information

1
Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA. Electronic address: mewall@lanl.gov.
2
Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.
3
Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
4
Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

Abstract

Problems in biology increasingly need models of protein flexibility to understand and control protein function. At the same time, as they improve, crystallographic methods are marching closer to the limits of what can be learned from Bragg data in isolation. It is thus inevitable that mainstream protein crystallography will turn to diffuse scattering to model protein motions and improve crystallographic models. The time is ripe to make it happen.

PMID:
24507780
PMCID:
PMC4070675
DOI:
10.1016/j.str.2014.01.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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