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Adv Immunol. 2014;122:177-210. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-800267-4.00005-5.

Interleukin 10 receptor signaling: master regulator of intestinal mucosal homeostasis in mice and humans.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
Division of Emergency Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
4
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Program in Cell Biology at University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: scott.snapper@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Interleukin 10 (IL10) is a key anti-inflammatory cytokine that can inhibit proinflammatory responses of both innate and adaptive immune cells. An association between IL10 and intestinal mucosal homeostasis became clear with the discovery that IL10 and IL10 receptor (IL10R)-deficient mice develop spontaneous intestinal inflammation. Similarly, patients with deleterious mutations in IL10, IL10RA, or IL10RB present with severe enterocolitis within the first months of life. Here, we review recent findings on how IL10- and IL10R-dependent signaling modulates innate and adaptive immune responses in the murine gastrointestinal tract, with implications of their role in the prevention of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we discuss the impact of IL10 and IL10R signaling defects in humans and their relationship to very early-onset IBD (VEO-IBD).

KEYWORDS:

Colitis; IBD; IL10; IL10 receptor; Microbiome; Very early-onset IBD

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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