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Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2014 Jan-Feb;10(1):132-7. doi: 10.1016/j.soard.2013.10.019. Epub 2013 Nov 11.

Depression and infertility in women seeking bariatric surgery.

Author information

  • 1Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address: merrelj@ccf.org.
  • 2Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.
  • 3Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity has been associated with abnormalities in reproductive functioning and fertility in women. A number of potential mechanisms have been identified, including neuroendocrine functioning and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Associations between infertility, depression, and anxiety have been found in nonobese populations; however, the relationship between depression and infertility in women pursuing bariatric surgery has not been examined. This study sought to explore potential psychosocial correlates of infertility in a female bariatric population.

METHODS:

Data were analyzed from female patients of childbearing age (n = 88; 70.5% Caucasian; mean age 36.2; mean education 14.3 years; mean body mass index [BMI] 47.9 kg/m(2)) psychologically evaluated for bariatric surgery. Participants were dichotomized as Infertility+(n = 43) or Infertility-(n = 45) based on a medical history self-report questionnaire. Medical records were reviewed for demographic characteristics, BMI, physical and/or sexual abuse history, psychiatric medication usage, outpatient behavioral health treatment, and psychiatric diagnoses.

RESULTS:

Women identified as Infertility+were more likely to have been diagnosed with a depressive disorder not otherwise specified or a major depressive disorder (χ(2) = 3.71, P<.05, χ(2) = 4.33, P< .05) than Infertility-women. However, Infertility+women were less likely to be involved in outpatient behavioral health treatment (χ(2) = 5.65, P< .05) or to have a history of psychotropic medication usage (χ(2) = 4.61, P<.05).

CONCLUSION:

Women struggling with infertility may be more psychiatrically vulnerable than other bariatric surgery candidates and less likely to have received mental health treatment. Additional research on the association between fertility, depression, behavioral health treatment, and obesity is warranted. Future research should consider whether this potential relationship changes after bariatric surgery.

© 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric surgery; Behavioral health treatment; Depression; Infertility

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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