Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cell Metab. 2014 Feb 4;19(2):319-30. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2013.12.016.

Circadian clocks and feeding time regulate the oscillations and levels of hepatic triglycerides.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel.
2
Diabetes and Obesity Research Center, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, Orlando, FL 32827, USA.
3
Department of Biological Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel. Electronic address: gad.asher@weizmann.ac.il.

Abstract

Circadian clocks play a major role in orchestrating daily physiology, and their disruption can evoke metabolic diseases such as fatty liver and obesity. To study the role of circadian clocks in lipid homeostasis, we performed an extensive lipidomic analysis of liver tissues from wild-type and clock-disrupted mice either fed ad libitum or night fed. To our surprise, a similar fraction of lipids (∼17%) oscillated in both mouse strains, most notably triglycerides, but with completely different phases. Moreover, several master lipid regulators (e.g., PPARα) and enzymes involved in triglyceride metabolism retained their circadian expression in clock-disrupted mice. Nighttime restricted feeding shifted the phase of triglyceride accumulation and resulted in ∼50% decrease in hepatic triglyceride levels in wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that circadian clocks and feeding time dictate the phase and levels of hepatic triglyceride accumulation; however, oscillations in triglycerides can persist in the absence of a functional clock.

PMID:
24506873
PMCID:
PMC4261230
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2013.12.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center