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Chest. 2014 Jun;145(6):1286-1297. doi: 10.1378/chest.13-2137.

Use of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with COPD and the risk of TB and influenza: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Author information

1
National Taiwan University Health Data Research Center, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Pharmacy, and Department of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Center of Comparative Effectiveness Research, National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Pharmacy, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Graduate Institute of Clinical Pharmacy, and Department of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Center of Comparative Effectiveness Research, National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Pharmacy, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Clinical Science Center, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, England.
4
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
5
Center of Comparative Effectiveness Research, National Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial and Research, Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Pharmacy, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: mslai@ntu.edu.tw.
6
Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH; Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH.

Abstract

Background: The use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) is associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in patients with COPD. However, the risks of other respiratory infections, such as TB and influenza, remain unclear.Methods: Through a comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception to July 2013, we identified randomized controlled trials of ICS therapy lasting at least 6 months. We conducted meta-analyses by the Peto, Mantel-Haenszel, and Bayesian approaches to generate summary estimates comparing ICS with non-ICS treatment on the risk of TB and influenza.Results: Twenty-fi ve trials (22,898 subjects) for TB and 26 trials (23,616 subjects) for influenza were included. Compared with non-ICS treatment, ICS treatment was associated with a significantly higher risk of TB (Peto OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.04-5.03) but not influenza (Peto OR, 1.24;95% CI, 0.94-1.63). Results were similar with each meta-analytic approach. Furthermore, the number needed to harm to cause one additional TB event was lower for patients with COPD treated with ICSs in endemic areas than for those in nonendemic areas (909 vs 1,667, respectively).Conclusions: This study raises safety concerns about the risk of TB and influenza associated with ICS use in patients with COPD, which deserve further investigation.

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PMID:
24504044
DOI:
10.1378/chest.13-2137
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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