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Toxicol Lett. 2014 Apr 7;226(1):70-80. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2014.01.041. Epub 2014 Feb 3.

Integrated analytical techniques with high sensitivity for studying brain translocation and potential impairment induced by intranasally instilled copper nanoparticles.

Author information

  • 1CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China. Electronic address: bair@nanoctr.cn.
  • 2CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China; Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: zhanglili@sinap.ac.cn.
  • 3CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China. Electronic address: liuy@nanoctr.cn.
  • 4CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China. Electronic address: libai@ihep.ac.cn.
  • 5CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China. Electronic address: wangliming@ihep.ac.cn.
  • 6CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China. Electronic address: wangp@nanoctr.cn.
  • 7Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Alle 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Electronic address: ha@mil.au.dk.
  • 8Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Alle 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Electronic address: cbee@mil.au.dk.
  • 9CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology and Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China. Electronic address: chenchy@nanoctr.cn.

Abstract

Health impacts of inhalation exposure to engineered nanomaterials have attracted increasing attention. In this paper, integrated analytical techniques with high sensitivity were used to study the brain translocation and potential impairment induced by intranasally instilled copper nanoparticles (CuNPs). Mice were exposed to CuNPs in three doses (1, 10, 40 mg/kg bw). The body weight of mice decreased significantly in the 10 and 40 mg/kg group (p<0.05) but recovered slightly within exposure duration. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed that CuNPs could enter the brain. Altered distribution of some important metal elements was observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF). H&E staining and immunohistochemical analysis showed that CuNPs produced damages to nerve cells and astrocyte might be the one of the potential targets of CuNPs. The changes of neurotransmitter levels in different brain regions demonstrate that the dysfunction occurred in exposed groups. These data indicated that CuNPs could enter the brain after nasal inhalation and induced damages to the central nervous system (CNS). Integration of effective analytical techniques for systematic investigations is a promising direction to better understand the biological activities of nanomaterials.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Brain translocation; Copper nanoparticles; Histopathological examination; ICP-MS; SRXRF

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