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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2014 Nov-Dec;46(6):554-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2013.11.018. Epub 2014 Feb 4.

Attitudes, beliefs, and barriers related to milk consumption in older, low-income women.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Electronic address: amy.mobley@uconn.edu.
2
Department of Communication, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.
3
Nutrition Education Programs, Purdue University Extension, West Lafayette, IN.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine attitudes, beliefs, and barriers related to adequate milk consumption in low-income women ages ≥ 60 years.

METHODS:

Nine focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 59 women at congregate meal sites in a metropolitan area. Grounded in Social Cognitive Theory, focus group questions were used to explore personal, behavioral, and environmental factors associated with milk consumption.

RESULTS:

Key response themes indicated a positive attitude for the taste of milk (except for low-fat), a primary belief that milk was important for bones and health, and a primary barrier of gastrointestinal side effects.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Knowledge regarding the benefits of milk and the dislike of its taste were not the primary reason for the lack of consumption. Instead, gastrointestinal side effects seemed to be the major barrier to adequate consumption. Future nutrition campaigns should test strategies for lactose intolerance management when communicating with low-income older women.

KEYWORDS:

calcium; low-income population; milk; older adults; women

PMID:
24502965
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2013.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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