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Travel Med Infect Dis. 2014 May-Jun;12(3):253-7. doi: 10.1016/j.tmaid.2014.01.003. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

Congenital rubella syndrome and immunity status of immigrant women living in southern Italy: a cross-sectional, seroepidemiological investigation.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Images Morphological and Functional, University of Messina, Italy. Electronic address: dlogiudice@unime.it.
2
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Images Morphological and Functional, University of Messina, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

A National Programme to eliminate Measles and Congenital Rubella was implemented in Italy in 2003. It aimed to achieve elimination by 2010 in line with the targets set by the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rubella antibodies in samples of immigrant women living in southern Italy.

METHOD:

A seroepidemiologic study was conducted from 1 January 2008 to June 30 2009. 489 immigrant women resident in Messina were enrolled in the study. The detection of rubella antibodies was performed using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic data including age, country of origin, educational level and knowledge about rubella.

RESULTS:

The results of the seroepidemiological survey to detect rubella antibodies showed an overall seropositivity rate of 82.2%. Generally, knowledge about rubella and congenital rubella syndrome was lacking.

CONCLUSION:

Many immigrants are susceptible to rubella and may benefit from vaccination programmes. Additional catch-up vaccination strategies are urgently needed to eliminate the risk of congenital rubella syndrome for future generations.

KEYWORDS:

Antibody; Immigrants; Prevention; Questionnaire; Rubella

PMID:
24502919
DOI:
10.1016/j.tmaid.2014.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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