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Prev Med. 2014 May;62:108-12. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.018. Epub 2014 Feb 4.

A microenvironment approach to reducing sedentary time and increasing physical activity of children and adults at a playground.

Author information

1
Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND 58203-9034, USA. Electronic address: james.roemmich@ars.usda.gov.
2
Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND 58203-9034, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Test whether a micro-environment park intervention in Grand Forks, North Dakota, movement of seating away from a playground, would increase the physical activity and length of stay of park users.

METHOD:

Study 1, summer 2012: physical activity of children and adults was assessed during baseline (A1) with seating in usual, standardized locations; with seating removed from the playground (B); and with seating returned to original locations (A2). Study 2, summer 2013: the study was repeated with the inclusion of a daily 2-hour assessment during which activity of each family member was recorded every 15-min and length of stay was recorded.

RESULTS:

For both studies, the MET (metabolic equivalent) intensity was greater (p<0.02) during condition B than during A1 and A2. For adults, the odds of being in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity than sitting during condition B were 4.1 to 22.7 greater than those during conditions A1 and A2. During the 2-hour serial observations, MET intensities during condition B were greater (p<0.005) than those during A1 and A2. The duration families stayed at the park did not differ across conditions.

CONCLUSION:

Adults were more active when seating was not accessible. Removal of seating did not shorten the time that adults were willing to allow children to play.

KEYWORDS:

Built environment; Children; Micro-environment; Parks; Physical activity; Playgrounds; Social facilitation; Youth

PMID:
24502848
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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