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J Endocrinol. 2014 Mar 17;221(1):167-79. doi: 10.1530/JOE-13-0386. Print 2014 Apr.

High-fat diet aggravates glucose homeostasis disorder caused by chronic exposure to bisphenol A.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene MOE Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030, People's Republic of China School of Environmental Science and Public Health, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325000, China.

Abstract

Epidemiological findings on the association between bisphenol A (BPA, 2,2-bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane) exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are paradoxical. In animal studies, BPA has been shown to disrupt pancreatic function and blood glucose homeostasis even at a reference 'safe' level during perinatal period. In this study, we explored the effects of long-term paternal exposure to a 'safe' level of BPA on parents themselves and their offspring. Adult male genitor rats fed with either standard chow diet (STD) or high-fat diet (HFD) were treated respectively with either vehicle or BPA (50 μg/kg per day) for 35 weeks. The male rats treated with vehicle or BPA for 21 weeks were then used as sires, and the adult female rats were fed with STD during the gestation and lactation. Offspring rats were weaned on postnatal day 21 and fed with STD in later life. Metabolic parameters were recorded on the adult male rats and their adult offspring. BPA exposure disrupted glucose homeostasis and pancreatic function, and HFD aggravated these adverse effects. However, BPA exposure did not alter body weight, body fat percentage, or serum lipid. In addition, the paternal BPA exposure did not cause adverse reproductive consequence or metabolic disorder in the adult offspring. Our findings indicate that chronic exposure to a predicted 'safe' dose of BPA contributes to glucose metabolic disorders, and that HFD aggravates these adverse effects in paternal rats.

KEYWORDS:

autophagy; bisphenol A; endocrine disruptor; glucose homeostasis; high-fat diet

PMID:
24501380
DOI:
10.1530/JOE-13-0386
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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