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Amino Acids. 2014 May;46(5):1207-15. doi: 10.1007/s00726-014-1678-2. Epub 2014 Feb 6.

Influence of training status on high-intensity intermittent performance in response to β-alanine supplementation.

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1
Laboratory of Applied Nutrition and Metabolism, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Mello de Moraes, 65-Butanta, São Paulo, SP, 05508-030, Brazil.

Abstract

Recent investigations have suggested that highly trained athletes may be less responsive to the ergogenic effects of β-alanine (BA) supplementation than recreationally active individuals due to their elevated muscle buffering capacity. We investigated whether training status influences the effect of BA on repeated Wingate performance. Forty young males were divided into two groups according to their training status (trained: T, and non-trained: NT cyclists) and were randomly allocated to BA and a dextrose-based placebo (PL) groups, providing four experimental conditions: NTPL, NTBA, TPL, TBA. BA (6.4 g day(-1)) or PL was ingested for 4 weeks, with participants completing four 30-s lower-body Wingate bouts, separated by 3 min, before and after supplementation. Total work done was significantly increased following supplementation in both NTBA (p = 0.03) and TBA (p = 0.002), and it was significantly reduced in NTPL (p = 0.03) with no difference for TPL (p = 0.73). BA supplementation increased mean power output (MPO) in bout 4 for the NTBA group (p = 0.0004) and in bouts 1, 2 and 4 for the TBA group (p ≤ 0.05). No differences were observed in MPO for NTPL and TPL. BA supplementation was effective at improving repeated high-intensity cycling performance in both trained and non-trained individuals, highlighting the efficacy of BA as an ergogenic aid for high-intensity exercise regardless of the training status of the individual.

PMID:
24500111
PMCID:
PMC3984416
DOI:
10.1007/s00726-014-1678-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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