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BMB Rep. 2014 Mar;47(3):135-40.

The potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid for neuronal regenerative therapy.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Physiology, Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764, Korea.
2
Laboratory of Animal Reproduction and Physiology, Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764; Department of Biology Education, College of Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Korea.

Abstract

The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are derived from the mesoderm, are considered as a readily available source for tissue engineering. They have multipotent differentiation capacity and can be differentiated into various cell types. Many studies have demonstrated that the MSCs identified from amniotic membrane (AM-MSCs) and amniotic fluid (AF-MSCs) are shows advantages for many reasons, including the possibility of noninvasive isolation, multipotency, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory and nontumorigenicity properties, and minimal ethical problem. The AF-MSCs and AM-MSCs may be appropriate sources of mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine, as an alternative to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Recently, regenerative treatments such as tissue engineering and cell transplantation have shown potential in clinical applications for degenerative diseases. Therefore, amnion and MSCs derived from amnion can be applied to cell therapy in neuro-degeneration diseases. In this review, we will describe the potential of AM-MSCs and AF-MSCs, with particular focus on cures for neuronal degenerative diseases.

PMID:
24499672
PMCID:
PMC4163884
DOI:
10.5483/bmbrep.2014.47.3.289
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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