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PLoS One. 2014 Jan 31;9(1):e87314. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087314. eCollection 2014.

Vitamin D and caudal primary motor cortex: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

Author information

1
Gait and Brain Lab, Lawson Health Research Institute, Parkwood Hospital, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada ; Division of Geriatric Medicine, University Hospital; Memory Clinic; UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, Angers, France ; Robarts Research Institute, the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
2
Division of Geriatric Medicine, University Hospital; Memory Clinic; UPRES EA 4638, University of Angers, Angers, France.
3
Robarts Research Institute, the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
4
Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University Hospital, the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
5
Gait and Brain Lab, Lawson Health Research Institute, Parkwood Hospital, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vitamin D is involved in brain physiology and lower-extremity function. We investigated spectroscopy in a cohort of older adults to explore the hypothesis that lower vitamin D status was associated with impaired neuronal function in caudal primary motor cortex (cPMC) measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

METHODS:

Twenty Caucasian community-dwellers (mean±standard deviation, 74.6±6.2 years; 35.0% female) from the 'Gait and Brain Study' were included in this analysis. Ratio of N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr), a marker of neuronal function, was calculated in cPMC. Participants were categorized according to mean NAA/Cr. Lower vitamin D status was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentration <75 nmol/L. Age, gender, number of comorbidities, vascular risk, cognition, gait performance, vitamin D supplements, undernourishment, cPMC thickness, white matter hyperintensities grade, serum parathyroid hormone concentration, and season of evaluation were used as potential confounders.

RESULTS:

Compared to participants with high NAA/Cr (n = 11), those with low NAA/Cr (i.e., reduced neuronal function) had lower serum 25OHD concentration (P = 0.044) and more frequently lower vitamin D status (P = 0.038). Lower vitamin D status was cross-sectionally associated with a decrease in NAA/Cr after adjustment for clinical characteristics (β = -0.41, P = 0.047), neuroimaging measures (β = -0.47, P = 0.032) and serum measures (β = -0.45, P = 0.046).

CONCLUSIONS:

Lower vitamin D status was associated with reduced neuronal function in cPMC. These novel findings need to be replicated in larger and preferably longitudinal cohorts. They contribute to explain the pathophysiology of gait disorders in older adults with lower vitamin D status, and provide a scientific base for vitamin D replacement trials.

PMID:
24498072
PMCID:
PMC3909095
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0087314
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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