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PLoS One. 2014 Jan 31;9(1):e86919. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086919. eCollection 2014.

Pharmacogenetic-based efavirenz dose modification: suggestions for an African population and the different CYP2B6 genotypes.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda ; CIHR, Canadian HIV Trials Network, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
2
School of Pharmacy, Union University, Jackson, Tennessee, United States of America.
3
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
4
Departments of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Pediatrics and Anaesthesia, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada ; Biostatistics Unit, St. Joseph's Healthcare-Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
5
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital-Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Division of Translational Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pharmacogenetics contributes to inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetics (PK) of efavirenz (EFV), leading to variations in both efficacy and toxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of genetic factors on EFV pharmacokinetics, treatment outcomes and genotype based EFV dose recommendations for adult HIV-1 infected Ugandans.

METHODS:

In total, 556 steady-state plasma EFV concentrations from 99 HIV infected patients (64 female) treated with EFV/lamivudine/zidovidine were analyzed. Patient genotypes for CYP2B6 (*6 & *11), CYP3A5 (*3,*6 & *7) and ABCB1 c.4046A>G, baseline biochemistries and CD4 and viral load change from baseline were determined. A one-compartment population PK model with first-order absorption (NONMEM) was used to estimate genotype effects on EFV pharmacokinetics. PK simulations were performed based upon population genotype frequencies. Predicted AUCs were compared between the product label and simulations for doses of 300 mg, 450 mg, and 600 mg.

RESULTS:

EFV apparent clearance (CL/F) was 2.2 and 1.74 fold higher in CYP2B6*6 (*1/*1) and CYP2B6*6 (*1/*6) compared CYP2B6*6 (*6/*6) carriers, while a 22% increase in F1 was observed for carriers of ABCB1 c.4046A>G variant allele. Higher mean AUC was attained in CYP2B6 *6/*6 genotypes compared to CYP2B6 *1/*1 (p<0.0001). Simulation based AUCs for 600 mg doses were 1.25 and 2.10 times the product label mean AUC for the Ugandan population in general and CYP2B6*6/*6 genotypes respectively. Simulated exposures for EFV daily doses of 300 mg and 450 mg are comparable to the product label. Viral load fell precipitously on treatment, with only six patients having HIV RNA >40 copies/mL after 84 days of treatment. No trend with exposure was noted for these six patients.

CONCLUSION:

Results of this study suggest that daily doses of 450 mg and 300 mg might meet the EFV treatment needs of HIV-1 infected Ugandans in general and individuals homozygous for CYP2B6*6 mutation, respectively.

PMID:
24497997
PMCID:
PMC3909010
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0086919
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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