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Paediatr Child Health. 2013 Dec;18(10):529-32.

Active Healthy Kids Canada's Position on Active Video Games for Children and Youth.

Author information

1
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute; ; Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario;
2
Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute;
3
School of Sport, Exercise & Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough & The NIHR Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit, United Kingdom;
4
National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand;
5
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario.

Abstract

in English, French

The effect of active video games (AVGs) on acute energy expenditure has previously been reported; however, the influence of AVGs on other health-related lifestyle indicators remains unclear. To address this knowledge gap, Active Healthy Kids Canada (AHKC) convened an international group of researchers to conduct a systematic review to understand whether AVGs should be promoted to increase physical activity and improve health indicators in children and youth (zero to 17 years of age). The present article outlines the process and outcomes of the development of the AHKC's position on active video games for children and youth. In light of the available evidence, AHKC does not recommend AVGs as a strategy to help children be more physically active. However, AVGs may exchange some sedentary time for light- to moderate-intensity physical activity, and there may be specific situations in which AVGs provide benefit (eg, motor skill development in special populations and rehabilitation).

KEYWORDS:

Active video games; Children; Exergaming; Physical activity; Position statement

PMID:
24497779
PMCID:
PMC3907348

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