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Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71(6):405-14. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2013-101852. Epub 2014 Feb 4.

Quit interest, quit attempt and recent cigarette smoking cessation in the US working population, 2010.

Author information

1
Surveillance Branch, Division of Surveillance Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of cigarette smoking cessation and examine the association between cessation and various factors among workers in a nationally representative sample of US adults.

METHODS:

Data were derived from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Prevalence rates were calculated for interest in quitting smoking, making an attempt to quit smoking, and successful smoking cessation (defined as smokers who had quit for 6-12 months). Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with cessation after adjustment for demographic characteristics (age group, race/ethnicity, educational level and marital status).

RESULTS:

Data were available for 17 524 adults who were employed in the 12 months prior to interview. The prevalence of quit interest, quit attempt and recent cessation was 65.2%, 53.8% and 6.8%, respectively. Quit interest was less likely among workers with long work hours, but more likely among workers with job insecurity, or frequent workplace skin and/or respiratory exposures. Quit attempt was more likely among workers with a hostile work environment but less likely among workers living in a home that permitted smoking or who smoked ≥11 cigarettes/day. Recent smoking cessation was less likely among workers with frequent exposure to others smoking at work or living in a home that permitted smoking, but more likely among workers with health insurance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Factors associated with cessation interest or attempt differed from those associated with successful cessation. Cessation success might be improved by reducing exposure to others smoking at work and home, and by improving access to health insurance.

KEYWORDS:

cessation; national survey; quit interest attempt success; workers

PMID:
24497440
PMCID:
PMC4528304
DOI:
10.1136/oemed-2013-101852
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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