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Pest Manag Sci. 2014 Dec;70(12):1902-9. doi: 10.1002/ps.3754. Epub 2014 Mar 20.

EPSPS amplification in glyphosate-resistant spiny amaranth (Amaranthus spinosus): a case of gene transfer via interspecific hybridization from glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri).

Author information

1
Crop Production Systems Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Stoneville, MS, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Amaranthus spinosus, a common weed of pastures, is a close relative of Amaranthus palmeri, a problematic agricultural weed with widespread glyphosate resistance. These two species have been known to hybridize, allowing for transfer of glyphosate resistance. Glyphosate-resistant A. spinosus was recently suspected in a cotton field in Mississippi.

RESULTS:

Glyphosate-resistant A. spinosus biotypes exhibited a fivefold increase in resistance compared with a glyphosate-susceptible biotype. EPSPS was amplified 33-37 times and expressed 37 times more in glyphosate-resistant A. spinosus biotypes than in a susceptible biotype. The EPSPS sequence in resistant A. spinosus plants was identical to the EPSPS in glyphosate-resistant A. palmeri, but differed at 29 nucleotides from the EPSPS in susceptible A. spinosus plants. PCR analysis revealed similarities between the glyphosate-resistant A. palmeri amplicon and glyphosate-resistant A. spinosus.

CONCLUSIONS:

Glyphosate resistance in A. spinosus is caused by amplification of the EPSPS gene. Evidence suggests that part of the EPSPS amplicon from resistant A. palmeri is present in glyphosate-resistant A. spinosus. This is likely due to a hybridization event between A. spinosus and glyphosate-resistant A. palmeri somewhere in the lineage of the glyphosate-resistant A. spinosus plants. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

KEYWORDS:

Amaranthus spinosus; EPSPS; gene amplification; gene transfer; glyphosate; herbicide resistance; interspecific hybridization; introgression

PMID:
24497375
DOI:
10.1002/ps.3754
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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