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Ageing Res Rev. 2014 Mar;14:43-55. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2014.01.005. Epub 2014 Feb 2.

Aging related changes in determinants of muscle force generating capacity: a comparison of muscle aging in men and male rodents.

Author information

1
School of Healthcare Science, Cognitive Motor Function Research Group, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD, United Kingdom; Laboratory for Myology, Move Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 BT, The Netherlands. Electronic address: s.ballak@mmu.ac.uk.
2
School of Healthcare Science, Cognitive Motor Function Research Group, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD, United Kingdom.
3
School of Healthcare Science, Cognitive Motor Function Research Group, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD, United Kingdom; Laboratory for Myology, Move Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 BT, The Netherlands.
4
Laboratory for Myology, Move Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 BT, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Human aging is associated with a progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and force generating capacity, however the exact mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. Rodents models have often been used to enhance our understanding of mechanisms of age-related changes in human skeletal muscle. However, to what extent age-related alterations in determinants of muscle force generating capacity observed in rodents resemble those in humans has not been considered thoroughly. This review compares the effect of aging on muscle force generating determinants (muscle mass, fiber size, fiber number, fiber type distribution and muscle specific tension), in men and male rodents at similar relative age. It appears that muscle aging in male F344*BN rat resembles that in men most; 32-35-month-old rats exhibit similar signs of muscle weakness to those of 70-80-yr-old men, and the decline in 36-38-month-old rats is similar to that in men aged over 80 yrs. For male C57BL/6 mice, age-related decline in muscle force generating capacity seems to occur only at higher relative age than in men. We conclude that the effects on determinants of muscle force differ between species as well as within species, but qualitatively show the same pattern as that observed in men.

KEYWORDS:

Fiber number; Fiber size; Muscle aging; Muscle force; Muscle mass; Specific tension

PMID:
24495393
DOI:
10.1016/j.arr.2014.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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