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Dermatoendocrinol. 2013 Jan 1;5(1):181-5. doi: 10.4161/derm.23773.

What is the relationship between ultraviolet B and global incidence rates of colorectal cancer?

Author information

1
Graduate School of Public Health; San Diego State University; San Diego, CA USA.
2
Naval Health Research Center; San Diego, CA USA ; Division of Epidemiology; Department of Family and Preventative Medicine; University of California; La Jolla, CA USA.

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between ultraviolet B and global incidence of colorectal cancer, while controlling for relevant covariates. Linear regression was used to assess the relationship between latitude and incidence rates of colon cancer in 173 countries. Multiple linear regression was employed to investigate the relationship between ultraviolet B dose and colorectal cancer rates while controlling for per capita intake of energy from animal sources, per capita health expenditure, pigmentation, and life expectancy. Data on all variables were available for 139 countries. Incidence of colon cancer was highest in countries distant from the equator (R(2) = 0.50, p < 0.0001). UV B dose (p < 0.0001) was independently, inversely associated with incidence rates of colorectal cancer after controlling for intake of energy from animal sources, per capita health expenditure, pigmentation, and life expectancy (R(2) for overall model = 0.76, p < 0.0001). Consistent with previous research, UVB was inversely associated with incidence of colon cancer. Further research on vitamin D and prevention of colon cancer in individuals should be conducted, including studies of higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations than have been studied to date.

KEYWORDS:

Colon cancer; UVB; epidemiology; global; incidence; ultraviolet rays; vitamin D

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