Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2014 Dec;9(12):2041-8. doi: 10.1093/scan/nsu012. Epub 2014 Feb 3.

Someone has to give in: theta oscillations correlate with adaptive behavior in social bargaining.

Author information

1
Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile pablo.billeke@gmail.com.
2
Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile.
3
Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile.
4
Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile Centro Interdisciplinario de Neurociencias, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 8330024, Chile, Centro de Investigación en Complejidad Social, Facultad de Gobierno, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago 7610658, Chile, Instituto Psiquiátrico Dr. Horwitz Barak, Servicio de Salud Metropolitano Norte, Santiago 8431621, Chile, and Escuela de Psicología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile.

Abstract

During social bargain, one has to both figure out the others' intentions and behave strategically in such a way that the others' behaviors will be consistent with one's expectations. To understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these behaviors, we used electroencephalography while subjects played as proposers in a repeated ultimatum game. We found that subjects adapted their offers to obtain more acceptances in the last round and that this adaptation correlated negatively with prefrontal theta oscillations. People with higher prefrontal theta activity related to a rejection did not adapt their offers along the game to maximize their earning. Moreover, between-subject variation in posterior theta oscillations correlated positively with how individual theta activity influenced the change of offer after a rejection, reflecting a process of behavioral adaptation to the others' demands. Interestingly, people adapted better their offers when they knew that they where playing against a computer, although the behavioral adaptation did not correlate with prefrontal theta oscillation. Behavioral changes between human and computer games correlated with prefrontal theta activity, suggesting that low adaptation in human games could be a strategy. Taken together, these results provide evidence for specific roles of prefrontal and posterior theta oscillations in social bargaining.

KEYWORDS:

EEG; game theory; social interaction; strategic behavior; theta oscillations; ultimatum game

PMID:
24493841
PMCID:
PMC4249481
DOI:
10.1093/scan/nsu012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center