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Cancer Res. 2014 Feb 1;74(3):945-53. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-1157.

A transgenic mouse model for early prostate metastasis to lymph nodes.

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1
Authors' Affiliations: Departments of Cancer Genetics and Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.

Erratum in

  • Cancer Res. 2014 Apr 15;74(8):2374.

Abstract

The emergence of recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer following the failure of androgen-deprivation therapy represents the lethal phenotype of this disease. However, little is known regarding the genes and pathways that regulate this metastatic process, and moreover, it is unclear whether metastasis is an early or late event. The individual genetic loss of the metastasis suppressor, SSeCKS/Gravin/AKAP12 or Rb, genes that are downregulated or deleted in human prostate cancer, results in prostatic hyperplasia. Here, we show that the combined loss of Akap12 and Rb results in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) that fails to progress to malignancy after 18 months. Strikingly, 83% of mice with PIN lesions exhibited metastases to draining lymph nodes, marked by relatively differentiated tumor cells expressing markers of basal (p63, cytokeratin 14) and luminal (cytokeratin 8 and androgen receptor) epithelial cells, although none expressed the basal marker, cytokeratin 5. The finding that PIN lesions contain increased numbers of p63/AR-positive, cytokeratin 5-negative basal cells compared with WT or Akap12-/- prostate lobes suggests that these transitional cells may be the source of the lymph node metastases. Taken together, these data suggest that in the context of Rb loss, Akap12 suppresses the oncogenic proliferation and early metastatic spread of basal-luminal prostate tumor cells.

PMID:
24492704
PMCID:
PMC3916780
DOI:
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-1157
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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