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Anesthesiol Clin. 2014 Mar;32(1):237-61. doi: 10.1016/j.anclin.2013.10.012.

Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: dschwen1@jhmi.edu.
2
Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 N. Caroline Street, 6th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder of airway obstruction with multisystem implications and associated complications. OSAS affects children from infancy to adulthood and is responsible for behavioral, cognitive, and growth impairment as well as cardiovascular and perioperative respiratory morbidity and mortality. OSAS is associated commonly with comorbid conditions, including obesity and asthma. Adenotonsillectomy is the most commonly used treatment option for OSAS in childhood, but efforts are underway to identify medical treatment options.

KEYWORDS:

Adenotonsillectomy; OSAS; Obstructive sleep apnea; Pediatric

PMID:
24491659
DOI:
10.1016/j.anclin.2013.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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