Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Commun Disord. 2014 Jan-Feb;47:17-33. doi: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2014.01.001. Epub 2014 Jan 21.

Auditory-motor interactions in pediatric motor speech disorders: neurocomputational modeling of disordered development.

Author information

1
Utrecht Institute of Linguistics OTS, Utrecht University, Trans 10, 3512 JK Utrecht, The Netherlands; Centre for Language and Cognition, Faculty of Arts, University of Groningen, Oude Kijk in 't Jatstraat 26, 9712 EB Groningen, The Netherlands; Medical Psychology/Pediatric Neurology Centre/ENT, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: h.r.terband@uu.nl.
2
Centre for Language and Cognition, Faculty of Arts, University of Groningen, Oude Kijk in 't Jatstraat 26, 9712 EB Groningen, The Netherlands; Medical Psychology/Pediatric Neurology Centre/ENT, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein-Zuid 10, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: b.a.m.maassen@rug.nl.
3
Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 677 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard University/Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, E25-519, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Electronic address: fguenth@gmail.com.
4
Department of Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 677 Beacon Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address: jbrumberg@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:

Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between neurological deficits in auditory and motor processes using computational modeling with the DIVA model.

METHOD:

In a series of computer simulations, we investigated the effect of a motor processing deficit alone (MPD), and the effect of a motor processing deficit in combination with an auditory processing deficit (MPD+APD) on the trajectory and endpoint of speech motor development in the DIVA model.

RESULTS:

Simulation results showed that a motor programming deficit predominantly leads to deterioration on the phonological level (phonemic mappings) when auditory self-monitoring is intact, and on the systemic level (systemic mapping) if auditory self-monitoring is impaired.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest a close relation between quality of auditory self-monitoring and the involvement of phonological vs. motor processes in children with pediatric motor speech disorders. It is suggested that MPD+APD might be involved in typically apraxic speech output disorders and MPD in pediatric motor speech disorders that also have a phonological component. Possibilities to verify these hypotheses using empirical data collected from human subjects are discussed.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

The reader will be able to: (1) identify the difficulties in studying disordered speech motor development; (2) describe the differences in speech motor characteristics between SSD and subtype CAS; (3) describe the different types of learning that occur in the sensory-motor system during babbling and early speech acquisition; (4) identify the neural control subsystems involved in speech production; (5) describe the potential role of auditory self-monitoring in developmental speech disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Computational neural modeling; Developmental speech disorders; Perception-action; Speech motor control; Speech motor development

PMID:
24491630
PMCID:
PMC3971843
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcomdis.2014.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center