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Fertil Steril. 2014 Apr;101(4):1110-6. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.12.029. Epub 2014 Feb 1.

Daily physical activity and hot flashes in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Flashes Study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: gibsoncj@upmc.edu.
2
Departments of Psychiatry, Epidemiology, and Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the role of physical activity in menopausal hot flashes.

DESIGN:

Physiologic hot flash monitor and activity monitor over two 48-hour periods, with self-report in an electronic diary.

SETTING:

Community.

PATIENT(S):

51 midlife women.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Physiologically detected hot flashes and reported hot flashes with and without physiologic corroboration.

RESULT(S):

Competing models conceptualize physical activity as a risk or protective factor for hot flashes, but few studies have examined this relationship prospectively using physiologic measures of hot flashes and physical activity. When physiologic hot flashes, reported hot flashes, and reported hot flashes without physiologic corroboration were related to activity changes using hierarchic generalized linear modeling, adjusting for potential confounders, hot flash reports without physiologic corroboration were more likely after activity increases, particularly among women with higher levels of depressive symptoms. No other types of hot flashes were related to physical activity.

CONCLUSION(S):

Acute increases in physical activity were associated with increased reporting of hot flashes that lacked physiologic corroboration, particularly among women with depressive symptoms. Clinicians should consider the role of symptom perception and reporting in relations between physical activity and hot flashes.

KEYWORDS:

Hot flashes; menopause; physical activity

PMID:
24491454
PMCID:
PMC3972358
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.12.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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