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PLoS One. 2014 Jan 29;9(1):e87091. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087091. eCollection 2014.

NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043): results from in-depth interviews with a longitudinal cohort of community members.

Author information

1
Department of Health Behavior, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
2
Social, Behavioural and Biomedical Interventions Unit, Human Sciences Research Council, Pieternaritzburg, South Africa.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Zimbabwe. Harare, Zimbabwe.
4
Perinatal HIV Research Unit, Witswatersrand University, Soweto, South Africa.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
6
Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
7
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, Califorinia, United States of America.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043) is a community- randomized trial to test the safety and efficacy of a community-level intervention designed to increase testing and lower HIV incidence in Tanzania, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Thailand. The evaluation design included a longitudinal study with community members to assess attitudinal and behavioral changes in study outcomes including HIV testing norms, HIV-related discussions, and HIV-related stigma.

METHODS:

A cohort of 657 individuals across all sites was selected to participate in a qualitative study that involved 4 interviews during the study period. Baseline and 30-month data were summarized according to each outcome, and a qualitative assessment of changes was made at the community level over time.

RESULTS:

Members from intervention communities described fewer barriers and greater motivation for testing than those from comparison communities. HIV-related discussions in intervention communities were more grounded in personal testing experiences. A change in HIV-related stigma over time was most pronounced in Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Participants in the intervention communities from these two sites attributed community-level changes in attitudes to project specific activities.

DISCUSSION:

The Project Accept intervention was associated with more favorable social norms regarding HIV testing, more personal content in HIV discussions in all study sites, and qualitative changes in HIV-related stigma in two of five sites.

PMID:
24489841
PMCID:
PMC3906114
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0087091
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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