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PLoS One. 2014 Jan 29;9(1):e86708. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086708. eCollection 2014.

The personal human oral microbiome obscures the effects of treatment on periodontal disease.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, United States of America.
2
Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, United States of America.
3
CEINGE-Biotecnologie Avanzate, Napoli, Italy ; Dipartimento di Medicina Molecolare e Biotecnologie Mediche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli, Italy.
4
Section of Endodontics, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
5
Professor of Dentistry and Microbiology, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
6
BioScience Center, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, United States of America.
7
Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, United States of America ; Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States of America.

Abstract

Periodontitis is a progressive disease of the periodontium with a complex, polymicrobial etiology. Recent Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies of the microbial diversity associated with periodontitis have revealed strong, community-level differences in bacterial assemblages associated with healthy or diseased periodontal sites. In this study, we used NGS approaches to characterize changes in periodontal pocket bacterial diversity after standard periodontal treatment. Despite consistent changes in the abundance of certain taxa in individuals whose condition improved with treatment, post-treatment samples retained the highest similarity to pre-treatment samples from the same individual. Deeper phylogenetic analysis of periodontal pathogen-containing genera Prevotella and Fusobacterium found both unexpected diversity and differential treatment response among species. Our results highlight how understanding interpersonal variability among microbiomes is necessary for determining how polymicrobial diseases respond to treatment and disturbance.

PMID:
24489772
PMCID:
PMC3906071
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0086708
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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