Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Psychol Rev. 2014 Mar;34(2):118-29. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2014.01.001. Epub 2014 Jan 10.

Can mindfulness and acceptance be learnt by self-help?: a systematic review and meta-analysis of mindfulness and acceptance-based self-help interventions.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer, East Sussex BN1 9QH, UK; Sussex Mindfulness Centre, Research and Development Directorate, Hove BN3 7HZ, UK. Electronic address: kate.cavanagh@sussex.ac.uk.
2
Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Hove BN3 7HZ, UK; Sussex Mindfulness Centre, Research and Development Directorate, Hove BN3 7HZ, UK.
3
School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer, East Sussex BN1 9QH, UK.
4
Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Hove BN3 7HZ, UK; Sussex Mindfulness Centre, Research and Development Directorate, Hove BN3 7HZ, UK; Department of Psychology, Politics and Sociology, Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, UK.

Abstract

There is growing evidence that mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions have positive consequences for psychological and physical health. The most well-established of these interventions typically involve relatively large resource commitments, in terms of both the provider and participant. A number of recent studies have begun to explore whether the benefits of such interventions can be generalised to less intensive methods. Methods include pure and guided self-help utilising resources such as books and workbooks, computer programmes and applications and audio-visual materials. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that have evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of low-intensity interventions including mindfulness and acceptance-based components. Fifteen RCTs (7 ACT-based, 4 mindfulness-based and 4 multi-component interventions including elements of mindfulness and/or acceptance) were identified and reviewed. Interventions that included mindfulness and/or acceptance-based components produced significant benefits in comparison to control conditions on measures of mindfulness/acceptance, depression and anxiety with small to medium effect sizes. Engagement with the self-help interventions varied but on average two-thirds of participants completed post-intervention measures. Emerging research into low-intensity mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions is hopeful. Recommendations for research and practice are presented.

KEYWORDS:

Acceptance; Mindfulness; Self-help

PMID:
24487343
DOI:
10.1016/j.cpr.2014.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Health
    Loading ...
    Support Center