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Int J Parasitol. 2014 Mar;44(3-4):251-61. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.12.003. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Analysis of the transcriptome of adult Dictyocaulus filaria and comparison with Dictyocaulus viviparus, with a focus on molecules involved in host-parasite interactions.

Author information

1
Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: nyoung@unimelb.edu.au.
3
HHMI, Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.
4
Institute for Parasitology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
5
The Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
6
Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Eskitis Institute for Cell & Molecular Therapies, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
7
Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Institute of Parasitology and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: robinbg@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

Parasitic nematodes cause diseases of major economic importance in animals. Key representatives are species of Dictyocaulus (=lungworms), which cause bronchitis (=dictyocaulosis, commonly known as "husk") and have a major adverse impact on the health of livestock. In spite of their economic importance, very little is known about the immunomolecular biology of these parasites. Here, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of the adult transcriptome of Dictyocaulus filaria of small ruminants and compared it with that of Dictyocaulus viviparus of bovids. We then identified a subset of highly transcribed molecules inferred to be linked to host-parasite interactions, including cathepsin B peptidases, fatty-acid and/or retinol-binding proteins, β-galactoside-binding galectins, secreted protein 6 precursors, macrophage migration inhibitory factors, glutathione peroxidases, a transthyretin-like protein and a type 2-like cystatin. We then studied homologues of D. filaria type 2-like cystatin encoded in D. viviparus and 24 other nematodes representing seven distinct taxonomic orders, with a particular focus on their proposed role in immunomodulation and/or metabolism. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into nematode-host interactions. The findings lay the foundation for future experimental studies and could have implications for designing new interventions against lungworms and other parasitic nematodes. The future characterisation of the genomes of Dictyocaulus spp. should underpin these endeavours.

KEYWORDS:

Dictyocaulus spp.; Host–parasite interactions; Lungworms; Transcriptome

PMID:
24487001
PMCID:
PMC4040346
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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