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Can J Diabetes. 2014 Feb;38(1):32-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jcjd.2013.08.267.

Self-management, health service use and information seeking for diabetes care among Black Caribbean immigrants in Toronto.

Author information

1
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: i.hyman@utoronto.ca.
2
Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Steps to Equity, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this research was to explore self-management practices and the use of diabetes information and care among Black-Caribbean immigrants with type 2 diabetes.

METHOD:

The study population included Black-Caribbean immigrants and Canadian-born participants between the ages of 35 to 64 years with type 2 diabetes. Study participants were recruited from community health centres (CHCs), diabetes education centres, hospital-based diabetes clinics, the Canadian Diabetes Association and immigrant-serving organizations. A structured questionnaire was used to collect demographics and information related to diabetes status, self-management practices and the use of diabetes information and care.

RESULTS:

Interviews were conducted with 48 Black-Caribbean immigrants and 54 Canadian-born participants with type 2 diabetes. Black-Caribbean immigrants were significantly more likely than the Canadian-born group to engage in recommended diabetes self-management practices (i.e. reduced fat diet, reduced carbohydrate diet, non-smoking and regular physical activity) and receive regular A1C and eye screening by a health professional. Black-Caribbean immigrant participants were significantly more likely to report receiving diabetes information and care through a community health centre (CHC) and nurses and dieticians than their Canadian-born counterparts.

CONCLUSIONS:

CHCs and allied health professionals play an important role in the management of diabetes in the Black-Caribbean immigrant community and may contribute to this group's favourable diabetes self-management profile and access to information and care. Additional research is necessary to confirm whether these findings are generalizable to the Black-Caribbean community in general (i.e. immigrant and non-immigrant) and to determine whether the use of CHCs and/or allied health professionals is associated with favourable outcomes in the Black-Caribbean immigrant community as well as others.

KEYWORDS:

Black Caribbean; Caraïbes noirs; diabetes care; diabetes self-management practices; diabète de type 2; disparités raciales et ethniques; health services; immigrants; pratiques de prise en charge autonome du diabète; racial and ethnic disparities; type 2 diabetes

PMID:
24485211
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcjd.2013.08.267
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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