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Mayo Clin Proc. 2014 Feb;89(2):190-8. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.09.018.

Physical activity and dietary behavior in US adults and their combined influence on health.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise Science, Donna and Allan Lansing School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY. Electronic address: ploprinzi@bellarmine.edu.
2
Program in Epidemiology, School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.
3
Department of Exercise Science, Donna and Allan Lansing School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between objectively measured physical activity and dietary behavior and their combined effect on health.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Data for this study were obtained from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey cycles. The data were evaluated between September 9, 2012, and August 14, 2013. As part of the national survey, participants wore an accelerometer for 4 or more days to assess physical activity, blood samples were obtained to assess various biological markers, and interviews were conducted to assess dietary behavior. We selected a sample of 5211 participants and categorized them into 4 groups: (1) healthy diet and active, (2) unhealthy diet and active, (3) healthy diet and inactive, and (4) unhealthy diet and inactive.

RESULTS:

A total of 16.5% of participants (weighted proportions) were classified as consuming a healthy diet and being sufficiently active. After adjustments, participants were 32% more likely to consume a healthy diet if they met physical activity guidelines. For nearly all biomarkers, those who consumed a healthy diet and were sufficiently active had the most favorable biomarker levels. Compared with those who consumed a healthy diet and were active, participants who consumed an unhealthy diet and were inactive were 2.4 times more likely to have metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicate a relationship between objectively measured physical activity and dietary behavior and that participating in regular physical activity and eating a healthy diet are associated with better health outcomes when compared with diet or physical activity alone.

KEYWORDS:

AP; BMI; C-reactive protein; CRP; HDL; HEI; Healthy Eating Index; LDL; NHANES; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; PIR; RERI; SI; attributable portion; body mass index; high-density lipoprotein; low-density lipoprotein; poverty-to-income ratio; relative excess risk due to additive interaction; synergy index

PMID:
24485132
DOI:
10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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