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Clin Nutr. 2014 Jun;33(3):375-84. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.12.018. Epub 2014 Jan 9.

Multimodal interventions including nutrition in the prevention and management of disease-related malnutrition in adults: a systematic review of randomised control trials.

Author information

1
Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, King's College London, Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, United Kingdom.
2
Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division, King's College London, Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, United Kingdom. Electronic address: christine.baldwin@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

There has been a move to improve nutritional status in malnourished patients through the use of multimodal interventions (MI). There are currently no systematic reviews that have examined their effectiveness. This analysis aimed to examine the effects on nutritional, clinical, functional and patient-centred outcomes.

METHODS:

A systematic review and meta-analysis using Cochrane methodology.

RESULTS:

15 studies were included in the analysis, 13 comparing MI with usual care and 2 comparing MI with a nutrition intervention alone. Quality of studies varied and studies reported few relevant outcomes. Only 3 outcomes were compatible with meta-analysis; weight, mortality and length of stay (LOS). No statistically significant differences between groups were found. Narrative review was inconclusive. There was no evidence of benefit in the intervention groups in relation to body composition, functional status or quality of life (QoL). Intervention groups appeared to show a trend towards increased energy and protein intake however data was provided by only 2 studies (301 participants).

CONCLUSIONS:

No conclusive evidence of benefit for MI on any of the reviewed outcomes was found. Well designed, high quality trials addressing the impact of MI on relevant nutritional, functional and clinical outcomes are required.

KEYWORDS:

Malnutrition; Multimodal intervention; Nutrition support; Systematic review

PMID:
24485001
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2013.12.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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