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Blood Press. 2014 Oct;23(5):262-9. doi: 10.3109/08037051.2013.876771. Epub 2014 Feb 3.

Trends in antihypertensive treatment--lessons from the National Acute Stroke Israeli (NASIS) registry.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine D and the Hypertension unit, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center , Tel-Hashomer , Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent guidelines recommended different approaches to hypertension therapy. Our aim was to evaluate trends in blood pressure (BP) management among patients admitted with acute stroke over the past decade.

METHODS:

The study population comprised 6279 consecutive patients, admitted with an acute stroke, and included in a national registry of three consecutive periods conducted during the years 2004-2010. We compared patients' characteristics and temporal trends of antihypertensive therapy utilization before hospital admission.

RESULTS:

Among 4727 hypertensive patients, 3940 (83%) patients have taken antihypertensive drug therapy - 1430 (30.2%) a single agent, 1500 (31.7%) two agents and 1010 (21.4%) three or more antihypertensive agents. The most common class used was renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers (n = 2575; 54%) followed by beta-blockers (n = 2033; 43%). The same pattern was observed in patients treated with monotherapy. The use of RAS blockers and beta-blockers has increased over the years (p < 0.001 for both), whereas the use of diuretics decreased and the use of calcium antagonists remained stable. Among those who were treated with a single agent, the use of diuretics and calcium antagonists decreased and the use of RAS blockers increased, whereas the use of beta-blockers remained unchanged.

CONCLUSIONS:

RAS blockers and beta-blockers are the most common antihypertensive agents used in Israel. Over time, the use of RAS blockers and beta-blockers has increased, whereas the use of diuretics decreased.

KEYWORDS:

Beta-blockers; calcium antagonists; diuretics; drugs; hypertension therapy; renin–angiotensin-system blockers

PMID:
24483945
DOI:
10.3109/08037051.2013.876771
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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