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Angiogenesis. 2014 Jul;17(3):471-94. doi: 10.1007/s10456-014-9420-y. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Anti-angiogenic therapy for cancer: current progress, unresolved questions and future directions.

Author information

1
Tumour Biology Team, Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, Fulham Road, London, SW3 6JB, UK.

Erratum in

  • Angiogenesis. 2014 Jul;17(3):495-7.

Abstract

Tumours require a vascular supply to grow and can achieve this via the expression of pro-angiogenic growth factors, including members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family of ligands. Since one or more of the VEGF ligand family is overexpressed in most solid cancers, there was great optimism that inhibition of the VEGF pathway would represent an effective anti-angiogenic therapy for most tumour types. Encouragingly, VEGF pathway targeted drugs such as bevacizumab, sunitinib and aflibercept have shown activity in certain settings. However, inhibition of VEGF signalling is not effective in all cancers, prompting the need to further understand how the vasculature can be effectively targeted in tumours. Here we present a succinct review of the progress with VEGF-targeted therapy and the unresolved questions that exist in the field: including its use in different disease stages (metastatic, adjuvant, neoadjuvant), interactions with chemotherapy, duration and scheduling of therapy, potential predictive biomarkers and proposed mechanisms of resistance, including paradoxical effects such as enhanced tumour aggressiveness. In terms of future directions, we discuss the need to delineate further the complexities of tumour vascularisation if we are to develop more effective and personalised anti-angiogenic therapies.

PMID:
24482243
PMCID:
PMC4061466
DOI:
10.1007/s10456-014-9420-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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