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Sleep Med Rev. 2014 Jun;18(3):237-47. doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2013.11.004. Epub 2013 Nov 28.

Who is predisposed to insomnia: a review of familial aggregation, stress-reactivity, personality and coping style.

Author information

1
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Sleep & Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford, Level 6 West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. Electronic address: Christopher-james.harvey@ndcn.ox.ac.uk.
2
Department of Psychiatry, 3535 Market Street, Suite 670, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
3
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Sleep & Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford, Level 6 West Wing, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK.

Abstract

Insomnia is a common health complaint world-wide. Insomnia is a risk factor in the development of other psychological and physiological disorders. Therefore understanding the mechanisms which predispose an individual to developing insomnia has great transdiagnostic value. However, whilst it is largely accepted that a vulnerable phenotype exists there is a lack of research which aims to systematically assess the make-up of this phenotype. This review outlines the research to-date, considering familial aggregation and the genetics and psychology of stress-reactivity. A model will be presented in which negative affect (neuroticism) and genetics (5HTTLPR) are argued to lead to disrupted sleep via an increase in stress-reactivity, and further that the interaction of these variables leads to an increase in learned negative associations, which further increase the likelihood of poor sleep and the development of insomnia.

KEYWORDS:

5HTTLPR; Insomnia; Neuroticism; Personality; Stress-reactivity; Vulnerability

PMID:
24480386
DOI:
10.1016/j.smrv.2013.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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