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Physiol Behav. 2014 Sep;136:39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.01.013. Epub 2014 Jan 28.

Amylin activates distributed CNS nuclei to control energy balance.

Author information

1
Translational Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: ebaase@mail.med.upenn.edu.
2
Translational Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Amylin is a pancreas-derived neuropeptide that acts in the central nervous system (CNS) to reduce food intake. Much of the literature describing the anorectic effects of amylin are focused on amylin's actions in the area postrema, a hindbrain circumventricular structure. Although the area postrema is certainly an important site that mediates the intake-suppressive effects of amylin, several pieces of evidence indicate that amylin may also promote negative energy balance through action in additional CNS nuclei, including hypothalamic and mesolimbic structures. Therefore, this review highlights the distributed neural network mediating the feeding effects of amylin signaling with special attention being devoted to the recent discovery that the ventral tegmental area is physiologically relevant for amylin-mediated control of feeding. The production of amylin by alternative, extra-pancreatic sources and its potential relevance to food intake regulation is also considered. Finally, the utility of amylin and amylin-like compounds as a component of combination pharmacotherapies for the treatment of obesity is discussed.

KEYWORDS:

IAPP; Obesity; Pramlintide; Reward; VTA

PMID:
24480072
PMCID:
PMC4113606
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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