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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jan 28;11(2):1500-19. doi: 10.3390/ijerph110201500.

Joint effects of smoking and sedentary lifestyle on lung function in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study cohort.

Author information

1
Jackson Heart Study, Jackson, Mississippi, MS 39213, USA. brenda.w.campbell@jsums.edu.
2
Xavier University, New Orleans, Louisiana, LA 70125, USA. dsarpong@xula.edu.
3
Jackson Heart Study, Jackson, Mississippi, MS 39213, USA. clifton.addison@jsums.edu.
4
Hinds Community College, Jackson, Mississippi, MS 39213, USA. mswhite427@yahoo.com.
5
My Brother's Keepers, Jackson, Mississippi, MS 39157, USA. dhickson@mbk-inc.org.
6
Jackson Heart Study, Jackson, Mississippi, MS 39213, USA. wendywhite2001@yahoo.com.
7
Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia, WV 26505, USA. cecil.burchfiel@cdc.hhs.gov.

Abstract

This study examined: (a) differences in lung function between current and non current smokers who had sedentary lifestyles and non sedentary lifestyles and (b) the mediating effect of sedentary lifestyle on the association between smoking and lung function in African Americans. Sedentary lifestyle was defined as the lowest quartile of the total physical activity score. The results of linear and logistic regression analyses revealed that non smokers with non sedentary lifestyles had the highest level of lung function, and smokers with sedentary lifestyles had the lowest level. The female non-smokers with sedentary lifestyles had a significantly higher FEV1% predicted and FVC% predicted than smokers with non sedentary lifestyles (93.3% vs. 88.6%; p = 0.0102 and 92.1% vs. 86.9%; p = 0.0055 respectively). FEV1/FVC ratio for men was higher in non smokers with sedentary lifestyles than in smokers with non sedentary lifestyles (80.9 vs. 78.1; p = 0.0048). Though smoking is inversely associated with lung function, it seems to have a more deleterious effect than sedentary lifestyle on lung function. Physically active smokers had higher lung function than their non physically active counterparts.

PMID:
24477212
PMCID:
PMC3945550
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph110201500
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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