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Public Health Nutr. 2015 Jun;18(9):1610-9. doi: 10.1017/S1368980013003364. Epub 2014 Jan 9.

An implementation intervention to encourage healthy eating in centre-based child-care services: impact of the Good for Kids Good for Life programme.

Author information

1
1School of Medicine and Public Health,University of Newcastle,University Drive,Callaghan,NSW 2308,Australia.
2
2Hunter New England Population Health,Wallsend,New South Wales,Australia.
3
3Research Centre for Gender,Health and Aging (RCGHA),University of Newcastle,Newcastle,New South Wales,Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the impact of an implementation intervention designed to introduce policies and practices supportive of healthy eating in centre-based child-care services. Intervention strategies included staff training, resources, incentives, follow-up support, and performance monitoring and feedback.

DESIGN:

A quasi-experimental design was used to assess change over 20 months in healthy eating policy and practice in intervention and comparison child-care services.

SETTING:

The Hunter New England (HNE) region of New South Wales (NSW), Australia.

SUBJECTS:

All centre-based child-care services (n 287) in the intervention region (HNE) were invited and 240 (91% response rate) participated. Two hundred and ninety-six services in the rest of NSW were randomly selected as a comparison region and 191 participated (76% response rate). A sub-analysis was conducted on those services that provided children food (n 196 at baseline and n 190 at follow-up). Ninety-six provided menus for analysis at baseline (HNE, n 36; NSW, n 50) and 102 provided menus at follow-up (HNE, n 50; NSW, n 52).

RESULTS:

Services in the intervention region were significantly more likely to provide only plain milk and water for children (P = 0.018) and to engage parents in nutrition policy or programmes (P = 0.002). They were also more likely (P = 0.056) to have nutrition policy on home packed food. In addition, menus of services that provided lunch were significantly more likely to comply with healthy eating guidelines for sweetened drinks (P < 0.001), fruit (P < 0.001) and vegetables (P = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

An implementation intervention was able to modify policy and practice in a large number of child-care services so that they were more supportive of healthy eating.

KEYWORDS:

Child-care services; Healthy eating; Implementation intervention

PMID:
24477181
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980013003364
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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