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Public Health Nutr. 2014 Dec;17(12):2721-9. doi: 10.1017/S1368980013003315. Epub 2014 Jan 15.

Cross-sectional examination of physical and social contexts of episodes of eating and drinking in a national sample of US adults.

Author information

1
1Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences,Clinical Monitoring Research Program Directorate/CMRP,Support to National Cancer Institute,Health Behaviors Research Branch,SAIC-Frederick,Inc.,6130 Executive Blvd,Room 4039,MSC 7335,NCI-Frederick,Frederick,Rockville,MD 21702,USA.
2
2Gillings School of Global Public Health,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,NC,USA.
3
3Department of Preventive Medicine,University of Southern California,Los Angeles,CA,USA.
4
4Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences,National Cancer Institute,Rockville,MD,USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The current study characterizes associations between physical and social contexts of self-reported primary episodes of eating/drinking and sociodemographic and obesity-related variables in US adults.

DESIGN:

Multinomial logistic regression was used to analyse a nationally representative sample of adults from the 2006-2008 American Time Use Survey. Models identifying physical (where) and social (whom) contexts of primary eating/drinking episodes at the population level, controlling for demographic characteristics, weight status and time of eating, were conducted.

SETTING USA SUBJECTS:

A nationally representative sample of US adults (n 21 315).

RESULTS:

Eating/drinking with immediate family was positively associated with age (OR = 1·15 (95 % CI 1·04, 1·27) to 1·23 (95 % CI 1·09, 1·39)), education level (OR = 1·16 (95 % CI 1·03, 1·30) to 1·36 (95 % CI 1·21, 1·54)), obesity (OR = 1·13 (95 % CI 1·04, 1·22)), children in the household (OR = 3·39 (95 % CI 3·14, 3·66)) and time of day (OR = 1·70 (95 % CI 1·39, 2·07) to 5·73 (95 % CI 4·70, 6·99)). Eating in the workplace was negatively associated with female gender (OR = 0·65 (95 % CI 0·60, 0·70)) and children in the household (OR = 0·90 (95 % CI 0·83, 0·98)), while positively associated with non-white status (OR = 1·14 (95 % CI 1·01, 1·29) to 1·47 (95 % CI 1·32, 1·65)) and time of day (OR = 0·25 (95 % CI 0·28, 0·30) to 5·65 (95 % CI 4·66, 6·85)). Women (OR = 0·80 (95 % CI 0·74, 0·86)), those aged >34 years (OR = 0·48 (95 % CI 0·43, 0·54) to 0·83 (95 % CI 0·74, 0·93)) and respondents with children (OR = 0·69 (95 % CI 0·63, 0·75)) were less likely to eat in a restaurant/bar/retail than at home. Overweight and obese respondents had a greater odds of reporting an episode of eating in social situations v. alone (e.g. immediate family and extended family; OR = 1·13 (95 % CI 1·04, 1·22)) and episodes occurring in restaurant/bar/retail locations (OR = 1·12 (95 % CI 1·03, 1·23) to 1·14 (95 % CI 1·05, 1·24)).

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings underscore the multidimensional nature of describing eating/drinking episodes. Social and physical contexts for eating/drinking and their demographic correlates suggest opportunities for tailoring interventions related to diet and may inform intervention targeting and scope.

PMID:
24477030
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980013003315
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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