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PLoS One. 2014 Jan 27;9(1):e82004. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0082004. eCollection 2014.

Elevated serum triglyceride and retinol-binding protein 4 levels associated with fructose-sweetened beverages in adolescents.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate Institute of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
  • 2Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
  • 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
  • 4Department of Oral Hygiene, College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
  • 5Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
  • 6Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan ; Department of Family Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
  • 7Department of Public Health and Environmental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan ; Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
  • 8Health Policy and Systems Management Program, Health Sciences Center, School of Public Health, Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States of America.
  • 9Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
  • 10Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The metabolic effect of fructose in sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) has been linked to de novo lipogenesis and uric acid (UA) production.

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigated the biological effects of SSB consumption on serum lipid profiles and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) among Taiwanese adolescents.

METHODS:

We evaluated the anthropometric parameters and biochemical outcomes of 200 representative adolescents (98 boys and 102 girls) who were randomly selected from a large-scale cross-sectional study. Data were analyzed using multiple regression models adjusted for covariates.

RESULTS:

Increased SSB consumption was associated with increased waist and hip circumferences, body mass index (BMI) values and serum UA, triglyceride (TG) and RBP4 levels. Adolescents who consumed >500 ml/day of beverages half-to-heavily sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) exhibited TG and RBP4 levels 22.7 mg/dl and 13.92 ng/ml higher than non-drinkers, respectively. HFCS drinkers with hyperuricemia had higher TG levels than HFCS drinkers with normal UA levels (98.6 vs. 81.6 mg/dl). The intake of HFCS-rich SSBs and high value of BMI (≥24) interactively reinforced RBP4 levels among overweight/obese adolescents. Circulating RBP4 levels were significantly correlated with weight-related outcomes and TG and UA concentration among HFCS drinkers (r = 0.253 to 0.404), but not among non-drinkers.

CONCLUSIONS:

High-quantity HFCS-rich beverage consumption is associated with higher TG and RBP4 levels. Hyperuricemia is likely to intensify the influence of HFCS-rich SSB intake on elevated TG levels, and in overweight and obese adolescents, high BMI may modify the action of fructose on higher circulating levels of RBP4.

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