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Cardiorenal Med. 2013 Dec;3(4):221-31. doi: 10.1159/000355136. Epub 2013 Oct 2.

Changes in Central Aortic Pressure, Endothelial Function and Biomarkers in Hypertensive African-Americans with the Cardiometabolic Syndrome: Comparison of Amlodipine/Olmesartan versus Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan.

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1
Atlanta Vascular Research Foundation, Atlanta, Ga., USA.
2
Morehouse University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga., USA.

Abstract

Sixty-six self-identified African-American subjects with stage 1 and 2 hypertension and characteristics of the cardiometabolic syndrome were treated with amlodipine/olmesartan (A/O) versus losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (L/H) for 20 weeks in an open-label, active comparator fashion. Subjects not meeting a blood pressure (BP) value of <125/75 mm Hg on either regimen at week 14 were placed on additional or alternative therapy. After 20 weeks of therapy, systolic BP was reduced by 34.6 ± 4.2 mm Hg in the A/O group and by 27.0 ± 4.1 mm Hg in the L/H group (p = 0.012 A/O vs. L/H). Diastolic BP was reduced by 16.9 ± 2.0 mm Hg in the A/O group and by 12.3 ± 2.0 mm Hg in the L/H group (p = 0.022 A/O vs. L/H). There was a substantial increase in endothelial function of 44 and 103% in the L/H and A/O groups, respectively (p < 0.005 A/O vs. L/H). Central aorta augmentation pressure was significantly reduced by 42% with the A/O treatment, and a smaller, significant reduction of 28% was observed with the L/H treatment (p = 0.034 A/O vs. L/H). There was a reduction in sIL-6 levels of 20 and 33%, a reduction in serum leptin levels of 22 and 40%, and an increase in serum adiponectin of 19 and 46% in the L/H and A/O groups, respectively (p < 0.005 A/O vs. L/H for each biomarker). Treatment with A/O after 14 weeks reduced pulse wave velocity by 22% (p = 0.011 time comparison), whereas L/H treatment had no significant effect. Our findings suggest that, in addition to effective BP reduction, A/O differentially regulates markers of inflammation and obesity, thereby potentially providing greater vascular protection.

KEYWORDS:

African-Americans; Cardiometabolic syndrome; Compliance; Hypertension; Inflammation

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