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Elife. 2013 Jan 1;3:e01434. doi: 10.7554/eLife.01434.

Single-molecule analysis reveals self assembly and nanoscale segregation of two distinct cavin subcomplexes on caveolae.

Author information

1
Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

Abstract

In mammalian cells three closely related cavin proteins cooperate with the scaffolding protein caveolin to form membrane invaginations known as caveolae. Here we have developed a novel single-molecule fluorescence approach to directly observe interactions and stoichiometries in protein complexes from cell extracts and from in vitro synthesized components. We show that up to 50 cavins associate on a caveola. However, rather than forming a single coat complex containing the three cavin family members, single-molecule analysis reveals an exquisite specificity of interactions between cavin1, cavin2 and cavin3. Changes in membrane tension can flatten the caveolae, causing the release of the cavin coat and its disassembly into separate cavin1-cavin2 and cavin1-cavin3 subcomplexes. Each of these subcomplexes contain 9 ± 2 cavin molecules and appear to be the building blocks of the caveolar coat. High resolution immunoelectron microscopy suggests a remarkable nanoscale organization of these separate subcomplexes, forming individual striations on the surface of caveolae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01434.001.

KEYWORDS:

caveolae; cell-free protein expression; single-molecule

PMID:
24473072
PMCID:
PMC3903133
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.01434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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