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Gac Sanit. 2014 May-Jun;28(3):203-8. doi: 10.1016/j.gaceta.2013.12.003. Epub 2014 Jan 26.

[Association between hours of television watched, physical activity, sleep and excess weight among young adults].

[Article in Spanish]

Author information

1
Departamento de Salud Pública, Historia de la Ciencia y Ginecología, Universidad Miguel Hernández, San Juan de Alicante, Alicante, España.
2
Departamento de Salud Pública, Historia de la Ciencia y Ginecología, Universidad Miguel Hernández, San Juan de Alicante, Alicante, España; CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), España. Electronic address: enavarrete@umh.es.
3
Departamento de Salud Pública, Historia de la Ciencia y Ginecología, Universidad Miguel Hernández, San Juan de Alicante, Alicante, España; CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), España.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the association between excess weight or body mass index (BMI) and the time spent watching television, self-reported physical activity and sleep duration in a young adult population.

METHODS:

We analyzed cross-sectional baseline data of 1,135 participants (17-35 years old) from the project Dieta, salud y antropometría en población universitaria (Diet, Health and Anthrompmetric Variables in Univeristy Students). Information about time spent watching television, sleep duration, self-reported physical activity and self-reported height and weight was provided by a baseline questionnaire. BMI was calculated as kg/m(2) and excess of weight was defined as ≥25. We used multiple logistic regression to explore the association between excess weight (no/yes) and independent variables, and multiple linear regression for BMI.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of excess weight was 13.7% (11.2% were overweight and 2.5% were obese). A significant positive association was found between excess weight and a greater amount of time spent watching television. Participants who reported watching television >2h a day had a higher risk of excess weight than those who watched television ≤1h a day (OR=2.13; 95%CI: 1.37-3.36; p-trend: 0.002). A lower level of physical activity was associated with an increased risk of excess weight, although the association was statistically significant only in multiple linear regression (p=0.037). No association was observed with sleep duration.

CONCLUSION:

A greater number of hours spent watching television and lower physical activity were significantly associated with a higher BMI in young adults. Both factors are potentially modifiable with preventive strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Ejercicio; Exercise; Jóvenes adultos; Obesidad; Obesity; Overweight; Sleep; Sobrepeso; Sueño; Television; Televisión; Young adult

PMID:
24472533
DOI:
10.1016/j.gaceta.2013.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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