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Nat Commun. 2014;5:3071. doi: 10.1038/ncomms4071.

Generation of folliculogenic human epithelial stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
  • 2Department of Dermatology, Kligman Laboratories, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
  • 3Department of Computer Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102, USA.
  • 4Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

Abstract

Epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) in the hair follicle bulge are required for hair follicle growth and cycling. The isolation and propagation of human EpSCs for tissue engineering purposes remains a challenge. Here we develop a strategy to differentiate human iPSCs (hiPSCs) into CD200(+)/ITGA6(+) EpSCs that can reconstitute the epithelial components of the hair follicle and interfollicular epidermis. The hiPSC-derived CD200(+)/ITGA6(+) cells show a similar gene expression signature as EpSCs directly isolated from human hair follicles. Human iPSC-derived CD200(+)/ITGA6(+) cells are capable of generating all hair follicle lineages including the hair shaft, and the inner and outer root sheaths in skin reconstitution assays. The regenerated hair follicles possess a KRT15(+) stem cell population and produce hair shafts expressing hair-specific keratins. These results suggest an approach for generating large numbers of human EpSCs for tissue engineering and new treatments for hair loss, wound healing and other degenerative skin disorders.

PMID:
24468981
PMCID:
PMC4049184
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms4071
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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