Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Microbiol. 2014 Mar;22(3):138-46. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2013.12.011. Epub 2014 Jan 24.

Global spread of dengue virus types: mapping the 70 year history.

Author information

1
Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK. Electronic address: jane.messina@zoo.ox.ac.uk.
2
Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK.
3
Department of Entomology, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
4
Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EJ, UK.
5
Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Centre for Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Churchill Hospital, Oxford OX3 7LJ, UK; Nossal Institute of Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
6
Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Abstract

Since the first isolation of dengue virus (DENV) in 1943, four types have been identified. Global phenomena such as urbanization and international travel are key factors in facilitating the spread of dengue. Documenting the type-specific record of DENV spread has important implications for understanding patterns in dengue hyperendemicity and disease severity as well as vaccine design and deployment strategies. Existing studies have examined the spread of DENV types at regional or local scales, or described phylogeographic relationships within a single type. Here we summarize the global distribution of confirmed instances of each DENV type from 1943 to 2013 in a series of global maps. These show the worldwide expansion of the types, the expansion of disease hyperendemicity, and the establishment of an increasingly important infectious disease of global public health significance.

KEYWORDS:

dengue; serotypes

PMID:
24468533
PMCID:
PMC3946041
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2013.12.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center