Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Nutr Rep. 2013 Dec;2(4):274-282.

Dietary Cholesterol and Plasma Lipoprotein Profiles: Randomized-Controlled Trials.

Author information

1
Tufts University, JM USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, 711 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111, John.Griffin@Tufts.edu.
2
Tufts University, JM USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, 711 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111, phone: 617 556 3127, Alice.Lichtenstein@Tufts.edu.

Abstract

Early work suggested that dietary cholesterol increases plasma total cholesterol concentrations in humans. Given the relationship between elevated plasma cholesterol concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk dietary guidelines have consistently recommended limiting food sources of cholesterol. Current intakes are approaching recommended levels. Recently there have been calls to reassess the importance of continuing to recommend limiting dietary cholesterol. Over the past 10 years there have been a limited number of studies addressing this issue. Striking among these studies is the high degree of variability in background diet, subject characteristics and study design. Within the context of current levels of dietary cholesterol intake, the effect on plasma lipids concentrations, with primary interest in LDL-C cholesterol concentrations, is modest and appears to be limited to population subgroups. In these cases, restrictions in dietary cholesterol intake are likely warranted. The biological determinants of inter-individual variability remain a relatively understudied area.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Cholesterol absorption; Dietary cholesterol; Eggs; High density lipoprotein cholesterol; Low density lipoprotein cholesterol; Plasma cholesterol; Total cholesterol:high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center