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PLoS One. 2014 Jan 20;9(1):e85625. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085625. eCollection 2014.

Bacillus pumilus reveals a remarkably high resistance to hydrogen peroxide provoked oxidative stress.

Author information

1
Institute for Microbiology, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
2
Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Institute of Pharmacy, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
3
Institute of Biochemistry, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
4
Centre for Molecular and Biomolecular Informatics (CMBI), Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; and Division Processing and Safety, NIZO Food Research B.V., Ede, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Jülich, Germany.
6
AB Enzymes GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany.
7
Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Institute of Pharmacy, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany ; Institute of Marine Biotechnology, Greifswald, Germany.
8
Institute for Microbiology, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany ; Institute of Marine Biotechnology, Greifswald, Germany.

Abstract

Bacillus pumilus is characterized by a higher oxidative stress resistance than other comparable industrially relevant Bacilli such as B. subtilis or B. licheniformis. In this study the response of B. pumilus to oxidative stress was investigated during a treatment with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide at the proteome, transcriptome and metabolome level. Genes/proteins belonging to regulons, which are known to have important functions in the oxidative stress response of other organisms, were found to be upregulated, such as the Fur, Spx, SOS or CtsR regulon. Strikingly, parts of the fundamental PerR regulon responding to peroxide stress in B. subtilis are not encoded in the B. pumilus genome. Thus, B. pumilus misses the catalase KatA, the DNA-protection protein MrgA or the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase AhpCF. Data of this study suggests that the catalase KatX2 takes over the function of the missing KatA in the oxidative stress response of B. pumilus. The genome-wide expression analysis revealed an induction of bacillithiol (Cys-GlcN-malate, BSH) relevant genes. An analysis of the intracellular metabolites detected high intracellular levels of this protective metabolite, which indicates the importance of bacillithiol in the peroxide stress resistance of B. pumilus.

PMID:
24465625
PMCID:
PMC3896406
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0085625
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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