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PLoS One. 2014 Jan 17;9(1):e79575. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079575. eCollection 2014.

Canine parvovirus VP2 protein expressed in silkworm pupae self-assembles into virus-like particles with high immunogenicity.

Author information

1
Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province, China.
2
Agricultural Division, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, China ; College of Animal Science and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin Province, China.
3
Agricultural Division, College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, China.
4
Institute of Laboratory Animal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Bejing, China.
5
Biotechnology Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China.

Abstract

The VP2 structural protein of parvovirus can produce virus-like particles (VLPs) by a self-assembly process in vitro, making VLPs attractive vaccine candidates. In this study, the VP2 protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and assembled into parvovirus-like particles in insect cells and pupae. Electron micrographs of VLPs showed that they were very similar in size and morphology when compared to the wild-type parvovirus. The immunogenicity of the VLPs was investigated in mice and dogs. Mice immunized intramuscularly with purified VLPs, in the absence of an adjuvant, elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and were able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against CPV, while the oral administration of raw homogenates containing VLPs to the dogs resulted in a systemic immune response and long-lasting immunity. These results demonstrate that the CPV-VLPs stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses, and so CPV-VLPs may be a promising candidate vaccine for the prevention of CPV-associated disease.

PMID:
24465364
PMCID:
PMC3894932
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0079575
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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