Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nature. 2014 Feb 6;506(7486):71-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12941. Epub 2014 Jan 22.

An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10(-18) level.

Author information

1
1] JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390, USA [3].
2
1] JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390, USA [3] Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109, USA.
3
1] JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390, USA.

Abstract

Progress in atomic, optical and quantum science has led to rapid improvements in atomic clocks. At the same time, atomic clock research has helped to advance the frontiers of science, affecting both fundamental and applied research. The ability to control quantum states of individual atoms and photons is central to quantum information science and precision measurement, and optical clocks based on single ions have achieved the lowest systematic uncertainty of any frequency standard. Although many-atom lattice clocks have shown advantages in measurement precision over trapped-ion clocks, their accuracy has remained 16 times worse. Here we demonstrate a many-atom system that achieves an accuracy of 6.4 × 10(-18), which is not only better than a single-ion-based clock, but also reduces the required measurement time by two orders of magnitude. By systematically evaluating all known sources of uncertainty, including in situ monitoring of the blackbody radiation environment, we improve the accuracy of optical lattice clocks by a factor of 22. This single clock has simultaneously achieved the best known performance in the key characteristics necessary for consideration as a primary standard-stability and accuracy. More stable and accurate atomic clocks will benefit a wide range of fields, such as the realization and distribution of SI units, the search for time variation of fundamental constants, clock-based geodesy and other precision tests of the fundamental laws of nature. This work also connects to the development of quantum sensors and many-body quantum state engineering (such as spin squeezing) to advance measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit.

PMID:
24463513
DOI:
10.1038/nature12941
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Support Center