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Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2014 Mar-Apr;42:25-34. doi: 10.1016/j.ntt.2014.01.005. Epub 2014 Jan 21.

PCBs and ADHD in Mohawk adolescents.

Author information

1
Educational Psychology and Methodology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12222, USA. Electronic address: joanewman@gmail.com.
2
Educational Psychology and Methodology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12222, USA.
3
School Psychology, University at Albany, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12222, USA.
4
Department of Anthropology, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12222, USA; Center for the Elimination of Minority Health Disparities, 1400 Washington Ave., NY 12222, USA.
5
Department of Anthropology, 1400 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12222, USA; Center for the Elimination of Minority Health Disparities, 1400 Washington Ave., NY 12222, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, One University Place, Rensselaer, NY, USA.

Abstract

The present study examines the relationship between the levels of persistent polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in adolescents' blood serum and concurrent measures of their ADHD-like behavior derived from ratings provided by parents and teachers. Two measures with demonstrated diagnostic validity, the Conners and ADDES scales, are used. The study was conducted in partnership with the Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne where the St. Lawrence River and surrounding waterways have been contaminated with PCBs that have entered the food chain. This study examines a subset of the data derived from the Mohawk Adolescent Well-Being Study (MAWBS), which was designed to investigate psychosocial and health related outcomes of 271 adolescents aged 10 years to 17 years and whose mothers were likely to have consumed PCB-contaminated fish and wild game before and during their pregnancy. No evidence of negative effects of adolescent blood PCB levels on ADHD-like behavior was found, and indeed occasional findings were in the unexpected direction. The possibility of negative confounding by SES and breastfeeding history was examined but dismissed.

KEYWORDS:

ADHD; Adolescents; Native American; Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

PMID:
24462617
PMCID:
PMC4907323
DOI:
10.1016/j.ntt.2014.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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