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Am J Hum Genet. 2014 Feb 6;94(2):303-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.01.002. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

NR2F1 mutations cause optic atrophy with intellectual disability.

Author information

1
Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Bartiméus, Institute for the Visually Impaired, 3700 BA Zeist, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
2
Bartiméus, Institute for the Visually Impaired, 3700 BA Zeist, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
3
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
4
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
5
Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Institute for Genetic and Metabolic Disease, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
6
Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
7
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
8
Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
9
Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Research Institute for Oncology, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
10
Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
11
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
12
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
13
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
14
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
15
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
16
Department of Human Genetics, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Institute for Genetic and Metabolic Disease, Radboud university medical center, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Electronic address: Bert.deVries@radboudumc.nl.
17
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: schaaf@bcm.edu.

Abstract

Optic nerve atrophy and hypoplasia can be primary disorders or can result from trans-synaptic degeneration arising from cerebral visual impairment (CVI). Here we report six individuals with CVI and/or optic nerve abnormalities, born after an uneventful pregnancy and delivery, who have either de novo heterozygous missense mutations in NR2F1, also known as COUP-TFI, or deletions encompassing NR2F1. All affected individuals show mild to moderate intellectual impairment. NR2F1 encodes a nuclear receptor protein that regulates transcription. A reporter assay showed that missense mutations in the zinc-finger DNA-binding domain and the putative ligand-binding domain decrease NR2F1 transcriptional activity. These findings indicate that NR2F1 plays an important role in the neurodevelopment of the visual system and that its disruption can lead to optic atrophy with intellectual disability.

PMID:
24462372
PMCID:
PMC3928641
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.01.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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